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This one shows lots of use. Cover is loose on the frame and should be tacked down.. Most likely produced in We have only seen a couple of others like this. White band with triangle front and painted silver top. Needs to be cleaned up a bit. The interior of the helmet appears to have been re-sprayed but overall a great M1. Original chinstrap has been replaced with post war version with clips. Fixed loop, original chin straps. Apparently the owner served overseas and after return was sent to the 3RD as an instructor.

Dating ww2 helmets, navigation menu

The rear seam on a World War II helmet. Facebook Twitter By Olivier C. It was during the First World War that the need for a modern combat helmet was first recognised. The United States came somewhat late to the helmet game; initially issuing their troops with a batch of British Mk. The primitive M was to undergo a slight upgrade during the s, becoming the M A1, which remained standard issue for the US military, until when the M1 helmet was introduced.

A World War II period helmet clearly showing the front seam.

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Mild or Medium Construction Steel 0. Class A armor was good, and Japanese VH armor was rather poor. Armor was most effective as a single plate. This was not always practical. Back-to-back plates were less resistant to penetration than a single plate of equal total thickness, while plates separated by a significant air gap were much less resistant than a single plate. Oddly, Liberty ships were provided with up to 6″ of “plastic armor”, made of a mixture of asphalt and crushed stone, as splinter protection to the more critical portions of their superstructures.

Armor Penetration Formulas The maximum penetration of an AP shell was very roughly equal to its caliber; that is, a 14″ shell could penetrate up to 14″ of armor at likely battle ranges. More elaborate formulas were devised that took into account the weight and velocity of the shell, the angle of impact, and the quality of the armor.

Ob is the obliquity in degrees. The factor F took into account all other effects, including the composition of the armor and deviations from the ideal formula, and the Navy compiled extensive tables of F based on ballistic tests.

Original German Helmets

The M A1, or “Kelly” helmet was introduced in the summer of to replace the M , and essentially was an updated version of the WWI helmet. An M A1 helmet with heavy cork textured shell. Early M A1 using M shells were reconditioned with cork texture on the outer surface as can be seen on this example below, stamped “ZD 28”. Note how the cork appears quite heavily applied. Unlike the basic skull cap lining of the M , the new M A1 lining was size adjustable and consisted of four leather tongues tied together with a leather drawstring, and mounted onto an aluminium skeleton.

A leather crown cushion pad was positioned usually over the tongues but many examples exist where it is positioned under, as can be noted below.

Instead of the helmet sitting low over the nape of the neck it was worn more level on the head. The M1 was finally replaced during the s. Look out for more helmet and headgear related features from Olivier in the near future.

The helmet was well designed to protect heads from the greatest dangers in the trenches-falling shell fragments, dirt, and debris. But it did not provide good protection for the sides and back of the head. With the resurge of military life and expenditures, new overtures were made to American industrial firms to improve the protective coverage and ballistic limit of the M A1 and to take advantage of recent advances in steel alloy manufacture, liner materials, and mass production methods.

In addition, a two-piece helmet was considered desirable to meet the increasing variety and complexity of tactical and climatic conditions. The ideal shaped helmet was seen as one with a dome-shaped top following the full contour of the head and supplying uniform headroom for indentation, extending down the front to cover the forehead without impairing vision and down the sides as far as possible to be compatible with the rifle, etc. The M model was considered suitable for protecting the top of the head and by removing its brim, by adding sidepieces and rearpieces, and by incorporating the suspension system into a separate inner liner, the World War II Army helmet came into being.

The original test item was known as the TS3, and it received a favorable report from the Infantry Board in February The Army M1 helmet was standardized on 30 April and was approved on 9 June It was of two-piece design with an outer Hadfield steel shell and a separate inner liner containing the suspension system. The complete item weighed approximately 3 pounds, with the outer shell accounting for approximately 2. The ballistics properties of the outer shell had been improved so that it would resist penetration by a grain caliber.

The Riddell type of suspension used in football helmets was modified for the inner liner. The principle of the original Riddell suspension did not contain an adjustable headband, and this feature was developed for the helmet liner.

How to date WWII and Later US M1 Helmets

The M A1 helmet, adopted in , differed only in minor details. In , the M-1 “steel pot” helmet was adopted as a replacement in all the US armed services, although it did not become universal for at least another year. The new helmet was issued to the Marine Corps in the spring and early summer of At Guadalcanal , in August , the M1 helmet was common and the old “dishpan” helmet had mostly disappeared.

After its adoption in , the M-1 Steel Helmet became the symbol of U.

The US M1 has been in service since early ’40s to early ’80s so what distinctive features can tell us wether we have a wartime helmet or a postwar one? Let’s start with some basic rules: The shell.

Army Airborne jump helmet. Very early experimental helmet used by U. MKII talker helmet used by deck gunners and for onboard communications. The design features flared sides to accommodate the radio headset that allowed for directing fire and onboard communication. The interior shows a molded liner of heavy felt that fit the head size. Army Air Force officer visor hat, unmarked. This “low profile” visor hat is the style often worn by B17 pilots and officer aircrew.

Colonel Dwight Henry Sloan on calling card inserted into the sweat shield.

M 1 Helmet History Schiffer Military

A side view of a Vietnam- era M1 helmet shell with chin- strap. Army soldier wearing an M1 helmet in June 1. His helmet has a camouflage cover with additional natural camouflage added on the slots in the helmet’s cover.

Dating M1 shell – posted in STEEL AND KEVLAR HELMETS: Forum members, Ive got a McCord M1 helmet shell I purchased about ten years paint and chinstrap are in wonderful rap is OD#3 Shell is front seam, swivel bail Unfortunately it didnt come with a lot number is A.

This one is from an old collection that I was lucky enough to purchase. It is finished in a mid tan sand colour but with rust bleed and time has dulled to a beautifully patinated brown colour. The helmet displays an ET factory applied M. The item is complete with original M. All pins are present and are of the typical 35 nickel over brass construction, looking at traces to the edges these were clearly the pins that have always been within this scarce helmet.

The liner leather is of a mid brown and slightly greasy and oily, again with various names written upon the leather. It is all complete and good and supple with its original tie cord still present. A completely untouched beautifully patinated helmet. Although it is a bit rough and I have better condition helmets, this one is on my top shelf. This one must be its twin as they look so alike and it is also from the Channel Islands. Who knows they may both be from the photo!

Wishful thinking I suppose but a nice thought.

Dating the M1 Steel Helmet

Introduced in , the new chinstrap system was innovative and far superior to the previous generations. Replacement of the chinstraps had always been difficult in the M1. The original WWII straps were sewn in, requiring removal of the helmet to a depot in a rear area to be replaced. The later, improved T1 straps, introduced at the very end of the war were field-replaceable but still required a screwdriver or pliers to effect the change.

This final-generation strap was affixed to the bales by spring clips and made changing or replacing the straps quick and easy. One wonders why it took so long to come up with this nearly obvious solution to a long-term problem.

helmet shell dating Production markings Contrary to the information produced by some book authors, a production date can be determined when examining a WWII helmet shell.

The M A1 helmet, adopted in , differed only in minor details. In , the M-1 “steel pot” helmet was adopted as a replacement in all the US armed services, although it did not become universal for at least another year. The new helmet was issued to the Marine Corps in the spring and early summer of At Guadalcanal , in August , the M1 helmet was common and the old “dishpan” helmet had mostly disappeared. After its adoption in , the M-1 Steel Helmet became the symbol of U.

Today in WW II: Erwin Rommel’s German Afrika Korps. See also WW2 Books. M-1 Steel Helmet Origins A steel helmet is designed to protect the user from flying fragments of exploded ordnance. By extending further down the sides and back of the wearer’s head and neck, the M-1 was a big improvement over the M A1 helmet. The M model was considered suitable for protecting the top of the head.

Front seam fixed bale M1 Helmet.